Category Archives: Worth a read

Worth a read 11/28/2014

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 11/25/2014

  • One of the many great things about the Web is that it showcases plenty of stuff for teachers to utilize in their classrooms. No matter if you’re structuring lessons about digital citizenship, teaching with video, discussing the Bard, talking about student fitness, or looking to walk on the moon or tour the Sistine Chapel, there’s something helpful out there for every educator. We’re happy to be able to share some of that with you here in the list below, which features 80 very special and useful guides, links, resource banks, and much more.

    tags: teaching resources KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 10/28/2014

  • “If you are a blogger looking for free photos to use in your blog posts or a designer looking for free photography to use in your designs, then check out the websites below and you will find the best free stock photos.

    All of the photos that you will find on the websites below are free to use for commercial purposes, without asking permission or they need attribution so make sure you check before you use a photo.”

    tags: images creative commons copyright free photos KDSBytes

  • “One of education’s primary goals is to groom the next generation of little humans to succeed in the “real world.”

    Yes, there are mounds of curricula they must master in a wide breadth of subjects, but education does not begin and end with a textbook or test. Other skills must be honed, too, not the least of which is how to get along with their peers and work well with others. This is not something that can be cultivated through rote memorization or with strategically placed posters.

    Students must be engaged and cooperation must be practiced, and often. The following team-building games can promote cooperation and communication, help establish a positive classroom environment and — most importantly — provide a fun, much-needed reprieve from routine.”

    tags: games team-building collaboration KDSBytes

  • “Short animated lessons you’ll love, from atomic structure to the science of stage fright (and how to overcome it).

    Bite-size snacks of knowledge, TED-Ed Video Lessons are short, free educational videos written by educators and students, then animated by some of the most creative minds in the business. The topics of these addictive little videos range from quantum physics to the art of beatboxing, and once you watch one, you may want to watch 10 more.”

    tags: TED-Ed TED video classroom activities KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 10/22/2014

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 10/21/2014

  • Doctor Who’s latest adventure sees him teaming up with a Dalek and trying to save the universe, but also teaching children some early computer programming skills.

    This isn’t a TV show, however: it’s a game due to launch on Wednesday 22 October on the broadcaster’s CBBC website. The Doctor and the Dalek includes voice narration from current Doctor Peter Capaldi, and a new story by Phil Ford, who has written for the TV show.

    The free web game is aimed at 6-12 year-olds, and involves freeing a battered Dalek from a ship of Cybermen, then building it back up to full strength through puzzles based on the programming elements of the new English computing curriculum.

    tags: KDSBytes code computational thinking game based learning

  • In an age where everything can be “Googled” and online privacy no longer exists, students have a whole new reputation at stake—their digital reputation, or their digital footprint. A digital footprintis any online information about a person that can be searched, shared, and seen by a large, invisible audience.

    According to Educator’s Technology, “Managing one’s digital identity is a skill, so to speak, that we need to learn and teach our kids and students about. In a world digitally focused, the boundaries between the real and virtual are blurred.”

    tags: digital footprint digital citizenship students KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 10/13/2014

  • Helping students to cultivate the skills needed for writing is often about cultivating a love of writing.

    It’s true that not every student has a budding author in them, but each of them does have a need to be able to express themselves clearly, concisely and intelligently. Whether they want to go on to write the Great American Novel or simply present business ideas to colleagues, writing skills are essential. The best way to help them develop those skills is to make writing personal and give them a vested interest in communication.

    Blogs have become one of the most popular website formats in recent years. Websites like Blogger, WordPress and Weebly have become the essential ways for people of different walks of life to broadcast their personal stories, challenges and insights. This has created both a new generation of budding writers as well as a generation with a keen interest in the stories of others.

    tags: KDSBytes blogging student blogs writing

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 09/21/2014

  • The 21st Century Fluencies are not about hardware, they are about headware and heartware.
    We need to move our thinking beyond our primary focus on traditional literacy to an additional set of 21st-century fluencies that reflect the times we live in. That’s the essence of the 21st Century Fluencies! Today, it’s essential that all of our students have a wide range of skills that develop the ability to function within a rapidly changing society—skills far beyond those that were needed in the 20th century. These skills are not about technological prowess. The essential 21st Century Fluencies are not about hardware; they are about headware and heartware! This means critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, innovation, and so much more. These aren’t just for the students, though. The 21st Century Fluencies are process skills that we all need, and there is as much benefit in cultivating them within yourself as within your classroom.

    tags: 21st century learning 21st century skills digital literacy information literacy creativity collaboration KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 09/17/2014

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.