Tag Archives: collaboration

Worth a read 09/21/2014

  • The 21st Century Fluencies are not about hardware, they are about headware and heartware.
    We need to move our thinking beyond our primary focus on traditional literacy to an additional set of 21st-century fluencies that reflect the times we live in. That’s the essence of the 21st Century Fluencies! Today, it’s essential that all of our students have a wide range of skills that develop the ability to function within a rapidly changing society—skills far beyond those that were needed in the 20th century. These skills are not about technological prowess. The essential 21st Century Fluencies are not about hardware; they are about headware and heartware! This means critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, innovation, and so much more. These aren’t just for the students, though. The 21st Century Fluencies are process skills that we all need, and there is as much benefit in cultivating them within yourself as within your classroom.

    tags: 21st century learning 21st century skills digital literacy information literacy creativity collaboration KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

iPad news and views 09/08/2014

  • You’ve heard “collaboration” repeatedly referenced as an important 21st century skill. With built-in interfaces for connectivity, mobile devices such as iPads offer a wide variety of alternatives for people wanting to connect and work together. Collaboration can take many forms in an educational context and you may want to consider different tools depending on your specific objectives. Here’s a list of some common collaborative activities and the tools and apps you might want to consider for each one.

    tags: Sam Gliksman iPad collaboration classroom activities KDSiPad

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 06/27/2014

  • Children take to technology like fish take to water. Even as debates rage over how much technology we should let our children use, it comes down to one inescapable fact that the society of today and tomorrow is totally driven by technology. The impact of video games on children is well-researched.
    Let’s question – can we be Luddites in a world that is also tapping into children as design “partners” for innovation? Or should we embrace the best of technology and use it to strengthen their literacy and cognitive skills?
    Which are the creative technology skills we should encourage children to learn? Maybe, these five (though, feel free to suggest your own in the comments)…

    tags: comics cartoon apps moviemaking games mindmapping KDSBytes collaboration writing

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 05/07/2014

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Google Drive

Did you know…

Part of being a Google Apps for Education (GAFE) school means that, in addition to our email accounts and calendars, every staff member and student at KDS has access to Google Drive. We each have 30Gb of storage available compared to an individual’s allowance of 15Gb.

Google Drive includes tools like word processing (Word), spreadsheet (Excel), presentations (Powerpoint), forms and storage for all types of files – PDFs, images, audio, video and so on. If you upload an MS Office file you can even choose whether to convert it to the equivalent Drive format or leave it as an Office file.

Because Google Drive is a cloud service you have access to your files from any PC or mobile device that can access the internet and you can set up offline access on your PC. The Google Drive App is available for any smartphone or tablet.

But Google Drive is more than just an alternative word processor or file storage system, there’s a whole world of clever things you can do including:

  • save email attachments directly to your Drive
  • share a document so it can be viewed or edited by multiple people simultaneously
  • collaborate on a presentation
  • add comments to another person’s document – for example to a student’s work during the drafting process
  • gather information using forms

and much, much more.

This video from Google gives a brief overview of some of the possibilities:

and their Getting started with Google Drive pages will help you do just that.

If you want to know more about how Google Apps can be used in education, Chris Betcher, a Google Certified teacher from Sydney, has developed this presentation (using Google presentations of course!) about why he loves Google Apps. In it you will find lots of great ideas that might just inspire you to give something a go.

Are you using Google Drive? Have you found ways it makes your life easier in the classroom? Do you have ideas for creating engaging classroom activities using Google Drive? Please share in the comments.