Tag Archives: lesson plans

Worth a read 08/05/2014

  • The terms of service, also known as the document you’re supposed to read before signing up for a site or platform, is a treasure trove of legal guidelines, rules and permissions that few people really care about.

    But there are a few things you’re agreeing to, hidden within the jargon, that might change the way you use the web. Some permissions, like keeping personal information, protecting copyrights and preventing impersonation, are well-known and relatively innocuous. That said, there’s a chance you’re violating a term of service without even realizing it.

    Here are 10 things you didn’t realize you agreed to in the social network terms of service you didn’t read, but we did.

    tags: terms of service privacy digital literacy digital footprint KDSBytes

  • YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart.

    Google (which owns YouTube) built the lessons to educate students about YouTube’s policies, how to flag content, how to be a safer online citizen, and protect their identities.

    [There] is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Lessons are designed to fit within 50 minute classes, but can be adapted to fit your schedule:

    tags: digital citizenship Google YouTube video lesson plans KDSBytes

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

iPad news and views 07/06/2014

  • Slide2Learn presenter Laura Chaffey’s webpage includes lesson plans and student work samples organised by App and KLA & Topic, and download links for her presentations.

    tags: ipad apps classroom activities lesson plans presentations KDSiPad

  • The paperless classroom is a compelling concept for what it symbolizes as much as anything else.

    While it sounds sleek and futuristic and easy to organize and environmentally friendly, the reality is that paperless classrooms aren’t that simple. The “environmentally-friendly” part, for example, is wildly subjective: the costs of manufacturing–and eventually recycling and disposing of–tablets versus the loss of “renewable” trees and the subsequent waste that is environmentally-friendly.

    The same with being organized. When files are easy to find and save, that leaves more to sort, organize, and curate. And so on. So becoming a “paperless classroom” isn’t the utopia that’d make the decision to go fully digital such a no-brainer.

    But what a paperless classroom represents is important. Cloud-based collaboration. Mobile access. Simple sharing. Quick searching. Curriculum tagging. In short, the potential for agility, responsiveness, and personalization in teaching and learning. No, it’s not that simple. Nothing is. Assessment form, bandwidth, COPPA concerns and more muddy the waters.

    But if you’re looking for tools to give it a go, the following 26 ipad apps for a paperless classroom can help.

    tags: paperless apps for productivity apps ipad KDSiPad

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Worth a read 06/24/2014

  • Lesson plans using Google apps products. Categorised by product, subject and level.

    tags: GAFE google apps lesson plans classroom activities KDSBytes

  • Directory of newspapers from around the world, categorised by country/state/city/language. Features today’s front page from selected newspapers and ranks selected country’s newspapers by circulation.

    tags: newspaper KDSBytes

  • “Do you ever feel stuck in a rut while planning your language classes? Perhaps you spend a lot of time lecturing at the white board, use the same activities with different vocabulary for every unit, or rely on teaching students grammar because that’s how you were taught. No matter your “go to” activity, we are all much more engaging when we vary our activities and make them relatable. If the speaker is engaging, a good lecture every now and then is enjoyable. However, when faced with daily lectures, students dread class, and hence, learn less. So why not mix it up?

    When dreaming up new activities, our main focus should always be authenticity. If we make activities genuine, our students will be much more inclined to participate, acquiring new knowledge through the process. Many language teachers think that being authentic means decorating their classrooms with flags and other souvenirs collected through their travels. But true authenticity comes from the activities we use during class time, leaving an impact on the communicative skills of our students.”

    tags: KDSBytes language classroom activities

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.